Jumbla’s winning streak continues at The Bass Awards

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The bass has been dropped at Jumbla – in the form of another award!

For the eighth time this year, the stellar work of our creatives has been officially recognised – this time by The Bass Awards, with our animation Carben Creative taking home the Bronze gong in the Explanatory Video category.

The Bass Awards annually judges the best motion graphics, animation and broadcast design in the world, over the expanse of ten categories – from TV and Film Titles, to Showreel and Experimental. The winning entries were selected by an international jury of creatives and academics in the motion design field, and the fourth year of the competition saw entries from over 70 countries, as well as competing brands that included Twitter, Nike, Paramount, MTV and

We’re very proud and excited to be recognised on the international stage once more, and amongst some of the biggest players in the business (though we gotta admit, we’re almost getting used to it.

The Bronze honour puts us alongside the best of the best, with Lego taking home the Silver gong for their Force Awakens Trailer, which received over 15 million views within hours of going online. Nike was also awarded Bronze alongside Jumbla, with the celebrated label getting honoured for their latest commercial for their Lunar Epic Flyknit runner.

While it decides on the best in the animation field, The Bass Awards also pays homage to the original greats: the competition is named for graphic designer and Academy Award winner Saul Bass, whose motion graphics expertise was showcased in an impressive array of title sequences for films directed by the likes of Stanley Kubrick, Martin Scorsese and Alfred Hitchcock (Bass also drew the storyboards for Psycho!)

The client for our awarded video, Carben Creative, tells stories for brands – and they entrusted Jumbla with telling their story through animation. The agency specialises in creating video campaigns for education and health science – so, in accordance with this combination of the creative and the scientific, our animation for them revolved around the two building blocks of human civilisation: storytelling, and carbon itself.

The idea was to visually capture the full essence of storytelling and the way it shapes people,’ says Kane Rowlingson, one of the animators who brought the project to life. ‘It was important to give a real sense of space and time throughout the animation, as a way of showing the way stories have shaped human history all the way down to a molecular level.

‘In the animation, the scenes move and transition between one another seamlessly to create a real sense of scale and depth – as though we are constantly moving through space into something bigger.’  

Take a look at the inspiring animation below:

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