An insight into Jumbla Animation internal workshops

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Have you ever wondered what makes an animation seem so real? How you can take basic shapes and bring them to life, transforming them into something inspiring with personality and emotion.
Every fortnight Jumbla runs internal workshops where two of our Creatives present a concept / idea /  technique to the rest of the team.

Last week it was Kane and Frankie’s turn, presenting a Jumbla Animation workshop on Smooth animating techniques.
We thought we would give you a quick insight into what the guys went over in the workshop, and how we form a majority of of our animations.

 

Animation: Defined
“Animation lays infinite power in hands of its creator by merging all art genres into one able to metamorphose via motion unbounded by time or reality, bringing to life visions and ideas freed of mental and physical gravity. Bound only by imagination, it calls for fantasy, lore of tools and grasp of its infinite powers. In exchange it offers total control over a world of artist’s creation.” – Edward Bakst

 

Animation is: The Illusion of Movement
A simulation of movement created by displaying a series of pictures, or frames in sequence.

 

Animation has: 12 main Principles
Developed by the ‘old men’ of  Walt Disney Studios, amongst them Frank Thomas and Ollie Johnston, during the 1930s. These principles from a desire to devise a way of animating that seemed more ‘real’ in terms of how things moved, and how that movement might be used to express character and personality.

  1. Squash and stretch
  2. Anticipation
  3. Staging
  4. Straight ahead and pose to pose
  5. Follow through and overlapping animation
  6. Slow out & slow in ie easing
  7. Arcs
  8. Secondary action
  9. Timing
  10. Exaggeration
  11. Solid drawing
  12. Appeal

Animation Style: Defining personality
Brief, script, brand guidelines and music are all key aspects in defining the overall personality of animation. From these things you can begin to gauge whether your animation is Fun, Serious, Sad, Scary, Silly, Professional, Uplifting / inspiring.  Defining the personality at the beginning will really help when it comes to not only developing the look but also the style of animation you choose to use.

 

Character Animation: Creating emotions
When animating characters, every movement, every action must exist for a reason. If a character were to move about in a series of unrelated actions, it would seem obvious that the animator was moving it, not the character itself. All the movements and actions of a character are the result of its thought process. In creating a “thinking character,” the animator gives life to the character by connecting its actions with a thought process. Walt Disney said, “In most instances, the driving forces behind the action is the mood, the personality, the attitude of the character—or all three. Therefore, the mind is the pilot. We think of things before the body does them.”

 

 

Check out one of our favourite videos, by Cento Lodigiani, about the 12 principles of animation and how to bring “The Illusion of Life” to animation.
And make sure to keep an eye out in our next animated piece to see how many techniques you can pick up.

 

The illusion of life from cento lodigiani on Vimeo.

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